Factors that hinder the use of contraception among women of child bearing age in rural communities: the case of mabeta njanga community, south west region Cameroon

Project Details

Department
NURSING
Project ID
NU07
Price
5000XAF
International: $20
No of pages
52
Instruments/method
Quantitative
Reference
YES
Analytical tool
Descriptive statistics
Format
 MS Word & PDF
Chapters
1-5

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Abstract

This study looks at Factors that hinder the use of contraception among women of child bearing age in rural communities: the case of mabeta njanga community, south west region Cameroon. WHO (2003), estimated that about 75 million pregnancies worldwide are unplanned/unwanted. 

The rise in the number of unwanted pregnancies is significantly associated to inadequate knowledge on contraception and that more women especially in rural communities do not go for modern contraceptives methods. The aim of the study was to identify the factors that hinder the use of contraceptive amongst women in the Mabeta Njanga community.

The interviewer-administered guided questionnaire was recruited for data collection with a sample size population of 100. The study design was cross-sectional and participants were recruited into this study using a convenient sampling method.

Data were imputed into Microsoft 2016, analysed using the statistical package for social sciences and presented in frequencies of graphs, tables and charts. Results showed that the knowledge on contraceptives was fair (58%). The major factors hindering the use of contraceptives were poor attitude staff concern with contraceptive services (88.0%), long waiting time in health facilities (80.0%) and distances from health facilities (75.0%).

A low level of education was also significantly associated with contraceptive use. The less educated were found to be the least users of contraceptives (p. value 0.001). Despite contraceptives awareness of the participants and given that some contraceptive methods are provided free of charge in some government hospitals, their use in the study area was low

The government incorporates Mobile clinics offering family planning services among other Maternal Child Health services as part of the County’s effort to take healthcare services closer to its citizens. 

CHAPTER ONE

GENERAL INTRODUCTION

1.1 BACKGROUND

Knowledge of family planning is nearly universal with 95% of all women between the ages of 15 to 49 years knowing at least one method of modern family planning (Malone et at., 2010). Family planning is achieved through the use of contraceptive methods and the treatment of involuntary infertility.

The various conversational contraceptives (CC) methods available are hormonal and non-hormonal methods. Contraception means the prevention of conception (Denise,2010). Contraception is as old as mankind; it started since in the old testament with Onan who spilt his semen in the ground whenever he had sex with his brother’s wife because he avoiding to give offspring to his brother.

Most countries with the lowest rate of contraceptives use to experience a higher maternal infant and child mortality rate and higher fertility rate in Africa (WHO, 2012). Each year, 180-200millions pregnancies are reported all over the world.

About 75%t of these pregnancies are undesired with the result that, about 50 million ends to induce abortion. WHO (2012) estimated that about 20 million of the total number of induced abortion are at risk for the mother. WHO (2013) equally postulated that approximately 600000 women die each year because of pregnancy and delivery-related complications, that is about one maternal death per minute.

Up to 95-98% of these deaths occurred in developing countries where the risk of dying during pregnancy is compounded by a high number of pregnancies per women, poor socio-economic conditions and inadequacy of maternal care services in the countries.

Worldwide, the percentage of the couple currently using contraception is estimated to have reached 58% and the level of use is higher in the more developed region than in the less developed regions (WHO, 2013). While overall levels of contraceptive use remain higher in the more developed regions the gap is narrowing (Rimal, 2008)

However, in the group of least developed countries traditional methods of contraception account for 27% of all contraception use, a proportion far higher than that in the more developed regions (UNFPA, 2015).

In Cameroon, according to Macro (2017), an estimation of 0.3% to 0.5% of unwanted pregnancies was reported. Furthermore, the latest DHS in 2001 showed that 7.8% of the women aged 15-19 years were pregnant of their first child in rural communities. It is for these reasons that this study was carried out to look at the factors that hinder uptake of contraception in the Mabeta Njanga Community of the south-west region of Cameroon.

1.2 STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM

WHO (2003), estimated that about 75 million pregnancies worldwide are unplanned/unwanted.  The rise in the number of unwanted pregnancies is significantly associated to inadequate knowledge on contraception and that more women especially in rural communities do not go for modern contraceptives methods.

  Most of these unintended pregnancies are not carried to full term, but aborted often in unhygienic condition leading to serious consequences and has increase maternal and infant mortality rate. Also, 676 per 100 000 women aged 15 to 49 gets pregnant unwanted, with an estimated 32% of all maternal deaths attributed to unsafe abortions (Adhikari, 2009).

Adequate knowledge of family planning can reduce many of these mistimed and unplanned pregnancies, while at the same time it could reduce the number of unsafe abortions as well as the mortality rate (Campbell, 2006). In addition, according to Macro (2017), 56% of birth in Cameroon occurred in rural areas compared to 44% in urban communities.

These consequences are transferred nationally, impacting the nation’s economy and derailing achievements of the Sustainable development goals (SDGs). Contraceptive use optimization can effectively halt the overwhelming population growth and improve MCH.

Despite reports of low contraceptive use in rural communities in Cameroon, there are few studies showing the reasons behind the low uptake and the barriers to contraceptives uptake. This thus attracted this study to look at the factors that hinder contraceptives uptake amongst women in Mabeta Njanga Community of the SWR, Cameroon. 

1.3 RESEARCH QUESTIONS

  • What level of knowledge do women of the Mabeta Njanga community have on contraception?
  • What are the factors that hinder the use of contraceptive use amongst women of this community?
  • Do the socio-demographic characteristics of these women affects contraceptive uptake?

1.4 GENERAL OBJECTIVE

To determine factors that hinder the use of contraceptives amongst women at the Mabeta Njanga Community.

1.4.1 Specific objective

  • To assess the level of knowledge of the women of the Mabeta Njanga community regarding contraception.
  • To identify the factors that hinder the use of contraceptive use amongst women of this community.
  • To determine if socio-demographic characteristics of these women affect contraceptive uptake?

 

Factors that hinder the use of contraception among women of child bearing age in rural communities: the case of mabeta njanga community, south west region Cameroon, Factors that hinder the use of contraception among women of child bearing age in rural communities: the case of mabeta njanga community, south west region Cameroon, Factors that hinder the use of contraception among women of child bearing age in rural communities: the case of mabeta njanga community, south west region Cameroon

 

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